Health

d5tid: 
8

International Action Update (7/15/2011)

  • Posted on: 15 July 2011
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) conditions in Port-au-Prince were not good even before the devastating January 2010 earthquake.  Perversely, the poor often paid the most for drinking water.  Against this backdrop, a number of international organizations and non-governmental organizations are working with the Haitian government to help establish a more effective and equitable water system.  One of these non governmental organizations, International Action, has been involved with water related issues in Haiti since 2006.  Below is an update as to their latest activities.

Hunger and Hurricanes (6/6/2011)

  • Posted on: 6 June 2011
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Last week, Trenton Daniel wrote an article highlighting malnutrition and hunger in Haiti’s neglected rural areas.  Over the long term, the countryside needs agricultural modernization, better environmental management, and roads to move crops to regional markets.  Haiti first has to make it through hurricane season which began May 1st.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) anticipates an above normal hurricane season with a 70 percent chance of 12 to 18 named storms, including 6 to 10 hurricanes.  Storms put lives, crops, and infrastructure in Haiti at risk. 

Webinar: Cholera and Other Public Health Issues in Haiti (12/12/2010)

  • Posted on: 22 December 2010
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

On Wednesday, January 12th, the American Medical Association, the National Institutes of Health, the National Disaster Life Support Foundation Inc. and Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness will host a free webinar on the current status of public health and health care in Haiti, including the ongoing cholera response.  More information follows.  You can register for the event by clicking here. 

Partners in Health Releases 2010 Annual Report

  • Posted on: 19 November 2010
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Partners in Health (PIH) is one of Haiti’s most important health oriented non governmental organizations, with a model based more on solidarity and human rights than on charity.  In addition to its development activities, PIH has at times been called on to be a humanitarian responder such as during both Gonaives floods and most recently the earthquake.  PIH also operates in Rwanda, Burundi, Lesotho, Russia, and numerous other countries.  Below are highlights from the PIH 2010 Annual Report, which include construction of the largest public hospital outside of Port au Prince, in the city of Mirebalais.

The Peanut Solution

  • Posted on: 2 September 2010
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Plumpynut, a peanut based paste, has revolutionalized the way in which severely malnourished children around the world are treated.  Many young lives have been saved as a result.  There is now increasing attention on how Plumpynut variants can prevent children from becoming malnourished in the first place.  In Haiti, both Meds and Food for Kids (MFK) and Partners in Health (PIH) produce products similar to Plumpynut.  In the below New York Times article, Andrew Rice describes the promise, politics, and profitability of Plumpynut.  Considering the negative impact that malnutrition has on the health and cognitive development of children in Haiti, it is well worth a read. 

Recovery and Health Care in Haiti

  • Posted on: 15 August 2010
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The credibility of any government is determined in large part by its capacity and willingness to provide basic services.  Health care can bring people together when there is equal access, or divide people when there is not.  Before and after the earthquake, quality health care in Haiti was/is primarily provided by non-governmental and international organizations (NGOs/IOs). The NGOs and IOs have been instrumental in keeping disease outbreaks at bay and access to health care for many residents in Port au Prince, at least for now, is better than it was before the earthquake.  While significant accomplishments, much more remains to be done before we can say that the health care system is truly being reconstructed. 

2010 World Water Day

  • Posted on: 22 March 2010
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

March 22 is World Water Day.  Growing up, like many others, I did not appreciate how lucky I was to have clean, safe water.  We need it to drink and become sick if we do not have it.  We need it for agriculture and would become hungry without it.  We need it for washing, bathing, and clean health care facilities.  Likewise we need sanitation and hygiene to protect food, water, and health.  One billion people around the world still lack clean drinking water and 2.6 billion lack access to basic sanitation.  It doesn’t have to be this way.  World Water Day is an opportunity to ask what we can do in the year ahead to address the world's water crisis. 

World Pneumonia Day 2009

  • Posted on: 2 November 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Today is World Pneumonia Day 2009.  Every day, 4000 children die from pneumonia in Haiti and other countries throughout the developing world.  This is more than HIV/AIDS, measles, and malaria combined.  Despite that, it has not been a global health priority.  This could change as there is more attention being given this preventable and treatable disease.  While there is no single magic bullet, there are a series of proven interventions that, if scaled up, would protect and promote the health of children around the world.  Click here to learn which organizations participated in World Pneumonia Day 2009 and here to learn how you can be a part of the global fight against pneumonia, not just for one day, but throughout the year.

Carter Center Launches Haiti/DR Malaria Eradication Initiative

  • Posted on: 8 October 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is a piece by Miami Herald contributor Greg Blustein on a new initiative launched by the Carter Center to eradicate malaria in the Dominican Republic and Haiti within 10 years.  The funding will be used on house to house search for cases, free treatment and mosquito control, repellents for mosquito nets and walls in high risk areas, and for education and social mobilization in both countries.  Malaria is a nasty disease to which children and pregnant women are especially vulnerable.  However, it is preventable, treatable and the international community knows what works.  We hope that this initiative will be a success for both Haiti and the DR.

Paul Farmer Appointed Deputy U.N Envoy to Haiti

  • Posted on: 12 August 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

As of last week, Paul Farmer was no longer under consideration for the position of USAID Director.  Today, it was announced that he has instead been appointed Deputy U.N Special Envoy to Haiti.  Clinton said that Farmer's "credibility both among the people of Haiti and in the international community will be a tremendous asset" to their work in Haiti.  While many looked forward to seeing him to reforming and leading USAID, this new position allows him to once again work full time on Haiti, a country for which he cares deeply.

Pages