Tourism

In Haiti, Tracing A Paradise Lost

  • Posted on: 6 December 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is a beautiful article (with similarly beautiful photos) taken by New York Times contributer Peter Kujawisnki.  The author, who previously lived in Haiti, visited as a tourist recently and reflects on what has and has not changed.  As with many of us who previously lived in Haiti, his memories are complicated and filters what he experiences now as a visitor.  He sees signs of progress and the potential renewal of long dormant tourism in a country that remains much in need of livelihood opportunities.  Visting Haiti, and experiecing what it has to offer, as he puts it is now neither brave nor unusual - just normal. 

Look Beyond the Rubble to Haiti's Rich History and Natural Beauty

  • Posted on: 5 May 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is an article by the Evening Standard's Claire Dodd about her experience visiting Haiti - not as an aid worker, missionary, or Haitian visiting family - but as a tourist.  Getting around Haiti may not be easy, but for those with a sense of adventure, it is well worth it.  Haiit's history of resistance, rich culture, and artistic traditions make it a unique and rewarding country to visit.  People often ask how to help Haiti - but as Jean Cyril Pressoir puts it, “...if you want to help...come as a tourist. Help us break from away from this pre-conceived idea, this prejudice that has us defined as a place where you come to help. Don’t come to help us. Come to enjoy yourself.”

Kiskeya Guest House Now Offering Cultural Tours

  • Posted on: 3 March 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haiti can be a rewarding but challenging tourism destination.  Having an organization to help with logistics and orientation during the first visit can be helpful. The Kiskeya Guest House in Leogane, in addition to offering a nice place to stay outside of Port au Prince, now offers tours that celebrate Haiti's cultural traditions with an emphasis on Port au Prince, Jacmel and Cap Haitien.  Haitian anthropologist Jean-Yves Blot an Professor Erold Saint-Louis will lead the various trips and Haitian Creole immersion programs.  The agenda for their "Cultural and Mystical Haiti" tour follows.  Note:  The Kiskeya Guest House is associated with Kiskeya Aqua Ferme, a community initiative devoted to raising tilapia and growing cassava, hot peppers, and sweet potatos. 

"Haiti From Below" Released

  • Posted on: 1 February 2013
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Nick Hobgood, a regional consultant for DAI, learned how to scuba dive off Haiti's northern coast.  He has since produced a high quality photography book of over 100 colorful pictures of fish, other marine life and landscapes taken between 2007-2010 in the Baie de l’Acul, Cachal Beach, Caracol, Cormier, Fort Labouque, Fort Liberté, Isla Amiga, and Labadie.  Proceeds from the first 250 books will support the expansion of Reef Check's EcoDiver program in Haiti.  More information follows.   

Envisioning a New Jacmel

  • Posted on: 30 May 2011
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Trade is more important to Haiti’s future than aid.  This includes agricultural revitalization, industrial development, and perhaps growth in the tourism sector. Jacmel, Haiti’s city of art, has always been one of its most appealing cities.  While the city took serious damage during the earthquake, the Capponi Group and the Jacmel Advisory Council are collaborating in the development of Jacmel's downtown, including the construction of a hotel.  At the same time, Yele has committed to developing Jacmel’s first tourism training school.  Concept art and video can be found on the Capponi Group website.  Additional information follows.

From Instability to Investment

  • Posted on: 8 October 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

In late 2006, we were blogging about Haiti’s kidnapping crisis.  Now in late 2009, we are blogging about investment opportunities.  Much has changed.  Just last week, hundreds of potential investors gathered for the largest investment conference ever held in Haiti, organized by the Inter American Development Bank with financial support from the Canadian government.  Will trade become more important than aid some  day?  This depends on the answers to two questions.  First, can investors make a return on their investments?  Second, will the government allocate new resources in an effective, accountable way that benefits all of Haiti and not just the cities?