Haiti Seeks International Recognition for Soup Joumou

  • Posted on: 26 March 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haiti has submitted its first application to the UN Agency for Education, Science, and Culture (UNESCO) for international recognition of a cultural contribution to humanity. Win or lose, its entry of Soup Joumou (Pumpkin Soup) is a unique and delicious dish that is symbolic of Haiti's identiy and freedom.  As polarized as Haiti is right now, it helps to remember the things that unite people, one of which is a fondness for the country's national soup.  The full article by Miami Herald journalist Jacquline Charles follows. 

UN Calls on Haiti to Settle Differences and Hold Elections

  • Posted on: 26 March 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The UN Security Council may not agree on much but it is unanimous in urging Haiti to settle political differences and hold elections.  The conditions for having an election are challenging - and flawed elections have made Haiti's situation worse in the past.  Still, the current political impasse is untenable.  As insecurity increases, gangs once again fill the void.  Protests are frequent, the economy is not growing, and basic services do not reach those most in need.  In short, the risk of collapse is real.  An article by Miami Herald journalist Jacqueline Charles folllows. 

Haitian Court Orders UN Peacekeeper to Pay Child Support in Landmark Case

  • Posted on: 15 March 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

There is a long history of peace-keeping operationa in Haiit - as well as a long history of peace-keepers exploting women and children.  A Haitian court has ordered a former UN peacekeeper from Uruguay to pay child support to a women he impregnated in 2011. This case is a step towards justice for the mother and the child but it could also encourage more court cases nationally and globally.   In Haiti alone, hundreds of children may have been fathered by UN peacekeepers. The full article by New Humanitarian Journalist Paisley Dodds follows. 

Miami Haitian Woman Feeds Thousands

  • Posted on: 11 March 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

One of the most distinctive aspects of Haitian culture is generousity.  If you are well and truly screwed, somebody will step up to help you.  Since the start of the pandemic, Haitian immigrant and Miami resident Doramise Moreau has cooked 1,000 meals a week on top of her job as a janitor.  The next time a politician disparages Haiti or the Haitian Diaspora, let us remember and share stories about the kindness and decency of people like Doramise.  The article in the Miami Times follows.  

Rhum Barbancourt and The Woman Who Runs It

  • Posted on: 11 March 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haiti makes some of the best rum in the world, the most iconic of which are made by Barbancourt.  Founded in 1862, it was now managed by CEO Delphine Nathalie Gardère. Barbancourt employs 500 people and works with 3000 local farmers making it a significant source of livelihoods.  Her goal is for Barbancourt to be an International Ambassador of sorts for Haiti.  Political unrest persists in Haiti - but so does the art, music, rum, humor, decency and everything else that makes Haiti unique.  Take a look at the full article in Sante Magazine, also copied below, and see if you can find or order a bottle of Barbancourt Rum.  You'll be glad that you did. 

Movie Review: Stateless

  • Posted on: 28 February 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haitian-Canadian filmmaker Michèle Stephenson’s documentary, Stateless, was the centrepiece film of this year’s Toronto Black Film Festival - which, due to COVID-19, was conducted online,  It examines the strained relationship between Haiti and the Dominican Republic and the consequences, sometimes violent, for Haitian migrant laborers and Dominicans of Haitian descent who, despite having been born in the Dominican Republic, continue to be denied citizenship due to racism and xenophobia.  A review by Sarah-Tai Black follows - a trailer is posted on The National Film Board of Canada’s Media Library and the documentary itself will follow. 

HELP Haiti Alumni Webinar (26 February 12:00 EST)

  • Posted on: 23 February 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haiti often seems to be perpetually instable, at a crossroads, at an impasse.  It is important to remember though that Haiti is full of talented young people who, if given the opportunity, go on to do great things.  Haiti is sorely in need of new leaders in government, in civil society, and in the private sector.  The Haitian Education and Leadership Program (HELP) has long provided scholarships to high performing students in Haiti who would not otherwise be able to pursue higher education.  On 26 February, HELP Haiti will hold a webinar in which several successful alumni will speak about their experiences with the program.  Think about participating and supporting their work.  More information follows as well as the registration link

Strikes, Violence Overwhelm Haiti's Crumbling Judiciary

  • Posted on: 29 January 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

There is no justice without a functioning judicial system and Haiti's is broken.  Prisons are sorely over-crowded in part due to 80% of inmates being held for years with no trial.  In addition, activists report a distrubing increase in illegal preventive detentions.  Judges are few, overwhelmed, and often threatened.  Haiti remains a fragile democracy and will remain so without justice and the rule of law.  If the judicial system improves, then we will know that Haiti is, at last, changing for better.  The full article by AP journalists Evens Sanon and Danica Coto is linked and follows below. 

From Bean To Bar, Haiti's Cocoa Wants International Recognition

  • Posted on: 31 December 2020
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

What comes to mind when you think of Haitian agricultural products? Perhaps rum, coffee and mangos which, truth be told, are very good. Haiti also produces very high quality cocoa although, like every export crop, it is held back from realizing its full potential by political instability and weak infrastructure.  However, there is room for growth as Haitian cocoa holds its own against any of its other Caribbean and Latin America neighbours.  The FECANNO cooperative along employees 4,000 farmers in Northern Haiti producing high quality cocoa. The full article by AFP journalist Amelia Baron follows. 

The Legacy of a Human Rights Champion

  • Posted on: 11 December 2020
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Part of the reason we made this website was to highlight good work being done by good people, especially Haitians, for the betterment of the country.  Haiti has many overlooked heroes, too many of whom pay the ultimate price for trying to bring about a more just society.  Monferrial Dorval, former head of the Port-au-Prince Bar Association and international human rights champion, was assassinated on August 28, 2020.  His legacy was remembered on 10 December which is International Human Rights Day.  He was committed to the rule of law, human rights, and drafted a bill that would prevent Haitians in Haiti and abroad from not having citizenship due to gaps in civil registration and documentation.  May his example be an inspiration to others. 

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