Miami Herald

Multinational Investigation Widens into Haiti Assassination, Including Who Bankrolled It

  • Posted on: 14 July 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The investigation into the assassination of Haitian Presien Jovenal Moise has broadened to include law enforcement in both Haiti and South Florida, including finding those who provided logistical and/or financial support.  Part of the investigation is being carried out in Colombia given the significant role of hired Colombian mercenaries, both in custody and at large. The full article by Miami Herald journalists Kevin Hall, Jacqueline Charles, and Jay Weaver follows. 

Renowned Haitian Expert on Infectious Diseases tapped by WHO for New Science Council

  • Posted on: 3 April 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

In these increasingly chaotic times it is good to be reminded of the work being done by Haiti's heroes - and Dr. Jean William "Bill" Pape is one of them.  Dr. Pape, one of the country's leaders in preventing and responding to infectious diseases, will be one of nine people around the world tapped by the World Health Organisation to provide guidance to its director.  It is an honor for him, and honor for Haiti, and a reminder that progress is possible in spite of political instability.  You can learn more about his work to date by visiting the GHESKIO website and the full article by Miami Herald journalist Jacqueline Charles follows. 

Haiti Seeks International Recognition for Soup Joumou

  • Posted on: 26 March 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haiti has submitted its first application to the UN Agency for Education, Science, and Culture (UNESCO) for international recognition of a cultural contribution to humanity. Win or lose, its entry of Soup Joumou (Pumpkin Soup) is a unique and delicious dish that is symbolic of Haiti's identiy and freedom.  As polarized as Haiti is right now, it helps to remember the things that unite people, one of which is a fondness for the country's national soup.  The full article by Miami Herald journalist Jacquline Charles follows. 

Cholera Arrived 10 Years Ago. Victims are Still Waiting for Compensation

  • Posted on: 25 October 2020
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

More than 850,000 Haitians have been infected with Cholera and 10,000 have died from it since being introduced by United Nations (UN) peacekeepers ten years ago.  There has been no compensation provided by the UN and its member states.  When the United Nations accepts no accountability for actions, it its less able to demand accountability from others.  While the UN has at times been benefical to Haiti, its unwillingess to right the wrongs of its peacekeeping forces, from sexual abuse and exploitation to cholera, undermine these efforts. The full article by Miami Herald journalist Jacqueline Charles follows.  

Ten Years After Haiti’s Earthquake: A Decade of Aftershocks and Unkept Promises

  • Posted on: 11 January 2020
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

It can take years or even decades for countries to recover from major disasters.  The aim is to build back better over time so the country becomes more resilient, better able to prevent and respond to a wide range of hazards.  Haiti remains just as vulnerable to major disasters as it was when the earthquake hit ten years ago.  There is not an improved building code nor a resourced and widely understood national emergency response plan nor drills to operationalize and refine such plans.  Haiti remains consumed by political instability, the root of which is the lack of an effective, accountable government that invests in its people.   Donors have become frustrated and less interested - that is until the next major disaster happens, which eventually it will.  An article below by Miami Herald journalist Jacqueline Charles and Jose Iglesias traces what has happened since 2010 and why. 

Plans to Rebuild Catholic and Episcopalian Cathedrals Take Shape

  • Posted on: 20 December 2012
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The Catholic and Episcopalian cathedrals were two prominent landmarks in Port-au-Prince prior to their destruction in the earthquake.  Plans are now underway for the reconstruction of each.  A Puerto Rican team has won an international design competition to rebuild the Catholic Cathedral.  The Episcopalian cathedral will be rebuilt by a Virginia-based firm. Each will be built back better, able to withstand hurricanes and earthquakes.  Learn more at the websites of the Catholic and Episcopalian Cathedrals.  Full Miami Herald article below.

Haiti's Working Better (Piti, Piti...)

  • Posted on: 8 December 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Kathie Klarreich, who has been covering Haiti since 1986, recently wrote a Miami Herald article on the many small yet promising signs that Port au Prince is becoming calmer, better governed, and more stable.  Challenges abound, including improving the delivery of health services and reforming the justice system, but these visible signs of progress contribute to a growing sense of optimism and a belief that things can and will continue to improve.

BBC 2009 World Challenge: Online Campaign for Haiti Gains Momentum

  • Posted on: 12 October 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The Decheteries De Carrefour Feuilles factory, founded by CASCAF, was selected among 12 finalists in the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) World Challenge 09 Competition.  This project has created jobs, cleaned up neighborhoods, and made available a reasonably priced alternative to the wood charcoal that has left Haiti's hills and mountains largest deforested.  If you also feel that this program deserves to be expanded and replicated, vote for it at the BBC World Challenge website.  Bon Chans! 

Carter Center Launches Haiti/DR Malaria Eradication Initiative

  • Posted on: 8 October 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is a piece by Miami Herald contributor Greg Blustein on a new initiative launched by the Carter Center to eradicate malaria in the Dominican Republic and Haiti within 10 years.  The funding will be used on house to house search for cases, free treatment and mosquito control, repellents for mosquito nets and walls in high risk areas, and for education and social mobilization in both countries.  Malaria is a nasty disease to which children and pregnant women are especially vulnerable.  However, it is preventable, treatable and the international community knows what works.  We hope that this initiative will be a success for both Haiti and the DR.

Haiti Food Security Update (8/25/2009)

  • Posted on: 25 August 2009
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Here's the good news - the first hurricane of 2009 passed on by.  The bad news is that we've got a long way to go until hurricane season is over.  The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts that there will be seven to eleven named storms in the Atlantic before the end of November, with the potential for three to six hurricanes.  As we saw last year, tropical storms can wreck havoc on both crops and infrastructure.  Humanitarian responders are gearing up. 

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