Governance

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America's Role in Haiti's Hunger Riots (Bill Quigley Report)

  • Posted on: 21 April 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haiti Innovation expressed disappointment and irritation with last week's New York Times article describing a solution to Haiti's hunger. Today, circulating through blogs all over cyber space, human rights lawyer Bill Quigley released a compelling report: "America's Role in Haiti's Hunger Riots". He goes beyond the trite phrases describing Haiti and delves into the truth behind high food costs. So although Haiti "needs to better feed itself", countries such as the US need to allow this to happen. Mr. Quigley raises the question, "Thirty years ago, Haiti raised nearly all the rice it needed. What happened?".

Across Globe, Empty Bellies Bring Rising Anger (New York Times)

  • Posted on: 20 April 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Last week, the New York Times ran an article about the relationship between hunger and insecurity, with considerable attention given to Haiti.  It notes the food rioting, the mud cookies, and the desperation that comes from not being able to feed onself and one's family.  Hunger is not new to Haiti.  While this article has raised awareness about hunger in Haiti, it does not go into why or offer up solutions which is unfortunate.

World Food Programme Director Discusses World Hunger, Haiti

  • Posted on: 19 April 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Josette Sheeran, the Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), spoke this week at the Center for Strategic and International Studies on “The Silent Tsunami" of hunger that threatens to push 100,000,000 more individuals into extreme poverty.  You can imagine that Haiti came up several times during her presentation.  Haitians are resilient people but soaring costs of food prices (and the subsequent increase in percentage of household income spent on food) is pushing people to their limits.  As Ms. Sheeran noted, “The difference between civilization and anarchy is seven meals.”   Hunger is a global problem and we do not have the option of not responding.

Haiti Food Security Update (4/17/2008)

  • Posted on: 17 April 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Needless to say, a lot has happened in Haiti over the last few weeks.  We saw food rioting in Port au Prince, Les Cayes, and Gonaives. Reuters has photos available here. Food insecurity and the rising cost of living were the primary (but probably not the only) factors.  These tensions have been building up for quite some time and it is frustrating that the government did not intervene sooner.  In the end, the Prime Minister was ousted and President Preval made an appeal to the international community for support.  Now is a good time to review both what the Haitian government has done in response and which donors have stepped up to offer their support during this difficult time.    

WFP Makes Haiti a Top Priority, Seeks More Aid

  • Posted on: 8 April 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

If you visit the webpage of the World Food Programme (WFP), you'll see an appeal for funds with which to assist Haiti is on the front page.  We have a very serious problem in Haiti and the WFP knows it.  Food insecurity brings political instability and the inevitable protests that are taking place in Port au Prince.  Rural Haiti will feel the reverbations.  It would not be realistic to expect WFP to feed all of Haiti.  However, if the agency receives the funds it needs, it can ensure the most vulnerable individuals and communities are assisted.

Sak Vid Pa Kanpe: Food Rioting Begins in Haiti

  • Posted on: 4 April 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

I expected to hear of food riots in Haiti.  Life has never been easy for Haitians but escalating food costs have made just getting by more and more difficult.  If you and I went a day without eating and did not know if the next day let alone the next week would bring more of the same, I would not be writing this and you would not be reading this - we would be out in the streets protesting!

Haitian Prime Minister to OAS - "Progress is Real"

  • Posted on: 29 March 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

According to Caribbean Net News,  Haitian Prime Minister Jacques-Édouard Alexis gave a speech on March 28th to the Organization of American States (OAS) highlighting significant improvements in both security and governannce.  A stable, democratic Haiti is strategically important to the Americas.   Haiti needs the help of its neighbors but doing so will require convincing them that Haiti can sustain this progress - that this is not another false promise.   

Digicel Haiti Foundation Delivers Promise of 20 Schools in Year One

  • Posted on: 18 March 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The article below (courtesy of bonpabon) announces that the Digicel Haiti Foundation met its goal of building twenty primary schools in its first year of operation.   Digicel, as the largest foreign investor in the history of Haiti, prevents a compelling model for others to follow - a socially conscious corporation that provides a much needed product, employs a substantial number of local staff, and funnels some of its its profits into education projects.  It makes sense for Digicel who will need educated employees as it grows and it makes sense for Haiti where long term development will depend on education.

The First Lady Visits Haiti - Can Diplomatic Visits Dispel Myths?

  • Posted on: 15 March 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The First Lady recently visited Haiti (read: Port au Prince), visting the well known GHESKIO (Haitian Group for the Study of Kaposi's Sarcoma and Other Opportunisting Infections) Center as well as a school, education being one of her personal priorities.  The last visit by a first lady to Haiti was by Hillary Clinton in 1998.  Politics aside, this is a sign of progress.  You can more about the visit in the New York Times. 

Haiti Ranked Twelfth on Brookings Instability Index - A Fair Assessment or Not?

  • Posted on: 8 March 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

According to the Brookings Institution, "Threats to international peace and security often come from the world’s weakest states. Such countries can fall prey to and spawn a host of transnational security threats, including terrorism, weapons proliferation, organized crime, infectious disease, environmental degradation, and civil conflicts that spill over borders."  The Index of State Weakness in the Developing World ranks 141 developing nations, including Haiti, according to economic, political, security and social welfare.   It is interesting to glance at, but how useful is it?

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