Haiti In Photos (Part 2)

  • Posted on: 12 January 2008
  • By: Bryan Schaaf
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Haitians say that what the eyes do not see, the heart cannot feel.  There is much to that.  Considering how numb many of us have become to violence, it is difficult to convey the enormity of the humanitarian crisis in Darfur without images.  Without photos, it is also hard to show the beauty of a long maligned country like Haiti.  Below are some more sites (and a link to a book) that convey the beauty of Haiti and Haitians in a way that writing cannot.  Enjoy!

Daniel Kedar: A well known photographer with a nice collection of photos from throughout Haiti and many other countries as well.

 

 

 

Windows on Haiti:  This very well organized online community has photographs from a number of different members.  Check them out for Haitian music and art as well.

 

 

Marcello Casal Jr:  Marcello pulled together an interesting multimedia presentation with photographs, video, and music.  It focuses on life in Cite Soleil.  A quote from a resident of Cite Soleil - "The journalists come and go, but they never come to Cite Soleil"

 

Snapshot Journeys: This is a travel blog focused on the northern portion of the country with photos from Cap Haitian, Fort Liberte, and Labadee Beach - a glimpse into a parallel universe where Haiti is a top tourist destination.  

 

Webshots:  This website has a collection of amateur photography from visitors to Haiti, a variety of locations.  Worth a look.

 

 

Paroles et Lumieres (Words and Light): This is the best book of photography that I have ever seen, Haiti or otherwise.  A real work of love. The photos are spectacular and the accompanying poetry in Kreyol, French, and English is amazing.  The translations say the same thing, but in a way that reflects the rhythm of each of the language.   This book always makes me wistful - can't recommend it highly enough.  

 

Comments

Another good site - a photographer who spent 88 days in Haiti and took a photograph each day. Enjoy.

http://www.88joursenhaiti.com/index.php?x=browse

5/18/2010
By MAGGIE STEBER
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http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/18/showcase-163/
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These are not beautiful photographs. Maybe they are morbid. They stand as evidence of what is gone and as indictments of a grim declaration that dismisses the history and culture of an already-beleaguered Haitian people. A few weeks ago, the mayor of Pétionville, Claire Lydie Parent, announced that the old cemetery would be demolished to make way for a bus station. In Haiti, that translates as an open area where buses gather to take passengers to the provinces. Pétionville is an upper- and middle-class neighborhood overlooking the demolished Port-au-Prince below.
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Undamaged by the earthquake that struck in January, the cemetery was crowded with brightly painted mausoleums decked out with metal flower wreaths. Names carved in marble marked the final resting place of many families, buried over a long period of time. A cross to Baron Samedi, the voodoo spirit of death, stood in a corner where people would bring him coffee and cigarettes in exchange for a favor.
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Until bulldozers came and demolished the whole cemetery. Where there was once a small, beautiful memorial, there is now a pile of rubble; another victim of Haiti’s earthquake, this time at human hands. People who had lost so much already were at a loss as to how to stop the demolition, if they even knew about it. Some friends and I went up onto the rubble to look for small remnants of this sacred place. Others went looking for family members.
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We photographed anything that might bear witness: tiny things, tragic things, bones, clothing, a shoe, part of a coffin were strewed in with the overwhelming rubble. The artist Magda Magloire was lucky, in a sense. Her niece worked in the mayor’s office and called to warn her about the demolition. Magda rushed to the cemetery and retrieved the bones of her two brothers, Stivenson Magloire, a famous Haitian painter, and his brother, Ramphis Magloire, also a painter. All three are the children of Louisiane St. Fleurant, the godmother of the Saint-Soleil movement in Haitian art.
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Stivenson Magloire was stoned to death in the early 90s during political turmoil. We went to Magda’s house and she showed us the bones. Outside a hard rain fell and drowned out all conversation. There, on an upstairs porch, stood a big plastic shopping bag filled with bones: long and yellow, several skulls in tact — the remains of her brothers.
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What will you do with them, she was asked. “I will rebury them someplace safe,” she replied. The earthquake took many victims in the 45 seconds it shook Haiti: over a quarter million people were killed, one million left homeless, thousands of houses reduced to a pile of concrete pebbles, and now this. For the people of Pétionville, it was as though another earthquake had struck. Neither in life nor in death would anything be spared.
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On Jan. 13, in “No End of Trouble. Ever,” Maggie Steber wrote, “It seems as though the fates pointed to Haiti and decided this is where they would put the portal between paradise and hell.” Eight days later, in “A Culture in Jeopardy, Too,” she added presciently: “Devastated by the loss of its people and its places, Haiti stands on the precipice of losing something more precious — as audacious as that sounds amid all this death — because it is transcendent. Haiti stands to lose its culture.”

New York Times
Lens
By DAVID W. DUNLAP
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http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/04/an-unguarded-portrait-of-haitia...
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Damon Winter had finished his photo session with Fabienne Jean, a young dancer in Haiti whose lower right leg was amputated in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. Overcoming her understandable reluctance, Ms. Jean removed her prosthetic limb in the middle of the shoot and set it to the side so that Mr. Winter could photograph her legs as they are. He shot two rolls of film with his Hasselblad and wound up with a fine, eminently publishable portrait. That isn’t the picture that appeared on Page 1 of The Times, however.
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Instead, while he was rewinding the second roll of film, Ms. Jean picked up the prosthesis and swung it jauntily over her shoulder. “Except for the fact that I lost a part of myself of Jan. 12, I’m still Fabienne,” she said, as reported by Deborah Sontag in “A Year Later, Haiti Struggles Back.” Photographers like Mr. Winter and Fred R. Conrad (“Wrong Station, Right Image“) make their own luck by having another camera on standby and, far more important, by recognizing instinctively when a defining moment presents itself.
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In less time than it takes to tell, Mr. Winter pulled out a digital camera and captured Ms. Jean with the prosthesis in hand, utterly unselfconscious. He also shot wider than the frame of the formal portrait, showing the makeshift studio he’d concocted in Port-au-Prince. “She is elegant and personable, a beautiful person,” Mr. Winter said of Ms. Jean, whom he photographed a month ago. “The picture we used on the front page so much more accurately captures her character that the more subdued pose.” (And for those sharp-eyed viewers who’d wondered: now you know why Mr. Winter’s other Haitian portraits have the distinctive black borders of film, while the Page 1 portrait does not.)

2/28/2011
AOL News
By Emily Troutman
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http://www.aolnews.com/2011/02/27/monsters-and-dragons-carnival-celebrat...
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JACMEL, Haiti -- Inside the broken walls of private gardens, under tents and tarps, a quiet army is poised to take the stage. The city will celebrate Carnival tonight, and artists have been working for weeks to get ready. Hundreds of papier-mache creatures wait for their debut in the streets. A half-dozen enormous crickets lay on their sides. Pharaohs and presidents are upside-down on the rubble. Diabolical masks, with faces as big as cars, sleep peacefully. In a shady town square, a dragon, 45 feet long, is covered under sheets. Jacmel is the heart of Haiti's weeks-long Carnival celebration. Artists took a hit when last year's festivities were canceled just after the Jan. 12 earthquake. This year, the recovering city has a modest budget of $250,000 to support dozens of musical groups and hundreds of artisans. But most papier-mache artists, including many father-son teams, do it for love. Though Haiti's tourism industry still is struggling, the country's cultural identity and heritage is considered a key to reconstruction. This week, the residents of Jacmel focused on constructing intricate paper masks and creatures -- often scary, but mostly beautiful icons of the imagination. Click through the gallery below to see some highlights.

4/18/2011
Associated Press
By BRETT ZONGKER
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Three Washington Post photographers won a Pulitzer Prize on Monday for breaking news photography in Haiti in the days and months following the country's devastating earthquake. Photographers Carol Guzy, Nikki Kahn and Ricky Carioti shared the prize and were cheered by dozens who gathered in the Post's newsroom, where plastic champagne flutes lined a filing cabinet. The judges said their photos were an "up-close portrait of grief and desperation" following the catastrophic quake in January 2010. "They are three exemplary photojournalists whose compassion comes through in their work," Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli said. This was the fourth Pulitzer for Guzy, who had been covering Haiti long before the earthquake. "I started my career covering Haiti, and my heart's always been there," she said. "That country's been through so much torture ... over the years it just keeps getting slammed."
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For Guzy, one of the lasting images from her work over the past year was a photograph of a girl in a school uniform who had been crushed at her desk. "She's just the picture of innocence," Guzy said. "We knew that the students were still sitting at their desks, so it was just a moment of people going about their daily lives and then boom, the earth trembled and life stopped." The win came 25 years after Guzy won her first Pulitzer Prize with Kahn's husband, Michel duCille, at The Miami Herald. Now duCille is the Post's photography director. Post Co. Chairman Don Graham joined the newsroom celebration and hugged the photographers.
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Kahn traveled back to Haiti several times after the earthquake, and Carioti documented the aftermath seven months after the quake. "I think the amazing thing was the opportunity to go back throughout the year and check up on the people I photographed on the first trip," Kahn said. "It was incredibly important to find the strength to go out and show the world what the Haitian people were going through." Carioti said he wanted to see the Pulitzer announcement online before he would believe he won. "For me, I had never been to Haiti," he said. "Just the shock of the conditions that people were living in seven months letter. ... I'm sure it's probably worse now." Washington Posts journalists also were finalists in two other categories: explanatory reporting and editorial writing.

1/2/2012
NPR
By Claire O'Neill
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http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2012/01/12/144968943/if-you-teach-a...
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"Foreign photographers come to Haiti," says renowned photographer Maggie Steber, "but all too often they start and stop with the earthquake." Steber, an American, is one of those foreign photographers. But she started well before the earthquake — some three decades ago — and hasn't stopped. Since 2010, Steber has been an adviser for the nonprofit FotoKonbit, an organization that promotes photography in Haiti. "When you see what Haitians think is beautiful to photograph, important, profound," she says, "you learn more about them than anything an outsider can show you. And they do it better because it is so intimate."
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FotoKonbit plugs into existing Haitian organizations, putting Haitian teachers with Haitian students. "Konbit," its website states, is a creole word that means "the coming together of similar talents in an effort toward a common goal." Though Steber appreciates the attention Haiti receives at times, she laments what she considers to be a one-sided view of the culture — one that focuses on the negative. Her hope is that photography will empower Haitians to show the complexities of their culture — the dark and the light. Joseph Jordan, 16, is enrolled in a similar program called Eyes on Haiti. "I ... don't have any problem with photographers showing the misery of my country," he says. "Because, let's be honest: It's the truth we see in their pictures. If hundreds of thousands of people are still living in tents, we photographers have the responsibility to show it." Meet Jordan, our Haitian photojournalist to be! from Alice Smeets on Vimeo. Joseph was 14 when that magnitude-7.0 earthquake rocked Haiti two years ago today. He considers himself lucky: His school and home remained intact, and he didn't lose any friends or family. But it is true that two full years have passed since the earthquake, and more than a half-million people are still living in camps that were meant to be temporary, according to The Associated Press. In short: Although there's no breaking news to keep Haiti in the headlines, things are still pretty dire there. Steber and the people behind Eyes on Haiti can agree on one thing: They think it's crucial to see Haiti as the locals do. "To put cameras in the hands of Haitians gives them the power to show us what they think is important, beautiful, strange, funny, and they will share intimate things that you and I might never see otherwise," Steber says.

By Sarah Parker
National Public Radio Interview
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http://nhpr.org/post/documenting-haitis-ruined-grandeur
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Photojournalist Swoan Parker recently toured Haiti's National Palace, which was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake. NPR's Laura Sullivan interviewed Parker about her photos of the once-grand building.
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Laura Sullivan: It looks like the building is literally falling down on top of you — how dangerous was it to walk around this former palace?
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Swoan Parker: Actually, pretty dangerous. I was a little afraid to take more in-depth pictures because of the instability of the structure. Because there are chunks of concrete just dangling from the ceiling, you are wondering if they're just going to come crashing down on you. So you walk as gingerly as possible, and just cross your fingers that nothing's going to happen.
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Sullivan: What were some of the most haunting photographs for you?
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Parker: Just looking at the cupola, which is now a symbol of the state of the country. But inside that cupola, there's a grand ballroom, so in my mind I was constantly wondering what it was like with some of the events that were there – some of the galas that they hosted — who might have been present.
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Sullivan: What is your sense of how people feel about the palace at this moment?
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For many people, it stands for Haiti's pride. This is a symbol for many people, so they consider it a great sense of loss.
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Sullivan: When you walked through the palace are there any vestiges of the seat of government that it once was?
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No, everything has been completely removed. You find the miscellaneous couch, but you don't find anything of significant importance.
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Sullivan: Are you planning to shoot the demolition of the National Palace?
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Yes, it's anticipated that demolition will begin within the next two weeks, but this is Haiti, so sometimes things are not always set in stone.

Miami Herald
BY PHILIPPE BUTEAU
PBUTEAU@MIAMIHERALD.COM
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A new photo exhibit in Wynwood aims to tell the story of a small island off Haiti through the eyes of some of its schoolchildren. “The kids are the ones taking the pictures and telling the story of the island,” said Ines Lozano, president of Flying High for Haiti, a nonprofit organization which will host an upcoming photo exhibition. The exhibition will take place between 7 and 10 p.m. on Saturday at 72 NW 25th St. in Wynwood and will feature 40 photos taken by 10 children from Île-à-Vache, an island off the southwest coast of Haiti. Admission is free, but photos will be available for sale from $50 to $250. All 10 kids are enrolled in École du Village, an elementary school on the island with 120 students enrolled from pre-kindergarten to sixth grade, according to Lozano. Despite the island’s reputation as a tourist destination, the island has little running water or electricity, and construction on roads began only recently. Flying High for Haiti sponsors École du Village, and will use money raised from the exhibition to buy school supplies, build new classrooms and pay teachers’ salaries. “It’s a beautiful place but the school needs help,” said Lozano. The organization, with its headquarters in Key Biscayne, was founded in May, but Lozano said she has travelled to and from Haiti helping children there for four years.
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She said she went to Haiti after hearing her husband, a journalist covering Haiti for 20 years, and a friend who is a pediatrician in the country speak at length to her about it. She went to Haiti because of what she heard, but she decided to keep coming back because of what she saw, particularly after the earthquake in 2010. Lozano first went to Haiti 30 days before the earthquake and when she went back she said she thought, “This is something I have to do,” Lozano said. That something is an educational project with an artistic twist, both for the children in Haiti and in Miami. Lozano has 15 years of experience as an educator, including serving as principal of International Christian School, now Key Point Academy International. Her experience as an educator and what she saw in Haiti inspired Lozano to start a project involving children in the country and in Miami. As a principal, she said she spoke to her students about Haiti and how they —the kids in Miami and Haiti — can help each other.
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“Not only help each other, but learn from each other as well.” Lozano said. “They have a lot of things in common despite their differences.” The exhibition will also feature 20 photos taken by Simon Russell, a travel and documentary photographer from New York. He and Lozano also have things in common despite their differences. Russell, who runs a youth soccer league and tournament on Île-à-Vache, said he and Lozano have a mutual love of kids growing up in an environment of academics and community. He was introduced to Lozano through a mutual acquaintance because kids in his soccer league also attend École du Village. Russell believes the exhibit will lead to a stronger connection between Americans and Haitians. “What will come out of it is a deeper understanding and appreciation of Haiti,” Russell said. He also believes the exhibition will help Haiti with its goal of increasing tourism to the country. “Île-à-Vache is one [Haiti’s] gems, and connecting the island with people in Miami will open doors for people to travel there.”

I hesitated before posting this link. Haiti has so many beautiful places. But in the end, it is important to show both the positive and the negative.

http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/haiti-giles-clarke-photography-port-au-pr...

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