Coca Cola, the IDB, and Technoserve Launch "Hope for Haiti" Initiative

  • Posted on: 31 March 2010
  • By: Bryan Schaaf
News: 

Coca Cola, the Inter American Development Bank (IDB), and Technoserve announced this morning a $7.5 million, five-year initiative, part of which will be focused on creating livelihood opportuntiies for 25,000 Haitian mango farmers.  A new flavor of Odwalla Juice called "Hope Haiti Mango Lime-Aid" has been launched.  Each time a bottle is purchased, 100% of the proceeds will go to the Haiti Hope Project.  More info on the new Odwalla flavor is available here and a photo from the launch with Bill Clinton and the CEO of Coca is available here.  The official press release follows below.


 

The Coca-Cola Company Announces $7.5 Million Haiti Hope Project to Boost Incomes of 25,000 Mango Farmers in Haiti

 

Odwalla’s Haiti Hope Mango Lime-Aid to Help Fund Collaborative Project with the Haitian Government, the Inter-American Development Bank and TechnoServe

 

NEW YORK--The Coca-Cola Company today announced the creation of the Haiti Hope Project, bringing together a coalition of business, government and civil society partners to create opportunity for 25,000 Haitian mango farmers and their families by supporting the development of a sustainable mango juice industry in the country. This five-year project, currently estimated at $7.5 million seeks to double the income of these farmers and to raise their standard of living, while contributing to the long-term development and revitalization of Haiti.

 

Muhtar Kent, chairman and CEO, The Coca-Cola Company was joined by Haitian government officials and key stakeholders to announce the Haiti Hope Project at the International Donors’ Conference for Haiti held at the United Nations today, “The Coca-Cola Company has been a part of the Haitian community since 1927 and our local bottling partner, Brasserie de la Couronne, is the largest private-sector employer in the country. Our $3.5 million investment in this partnership will be joined by contributions from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). This project is a great example of how lives can be changed when business, civil society and governments work together to build sustainable communities and help to create economic opportunity.”

 

The Project has garnered support from President Bill Clinton, co-chair of the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund and currently UN Special Envoy for Haiti, for its long-term commitment to the Haitian people, “The Coca-Cola Company responded to Haiti’s urgent immediate needs with financial support and beverages,” said President Clinton “The Haiti Hope Project goes a step further and exemplifies the innovative role that partnerships with the private sector can play in the reconstruction of Haiti.”

 

President George W. Bush, also co-chair of the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund added that “Coca-Cola has done something positive for Haitians by creating the Haiti Hope Project. The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund will focus on long-term rebuilding and will continue to promote bottom-up, job-creating investments such as this. I am grateful to Coca-Cola for setting such a fine example.”

 

The Prime Minister of Haiti, Jean-Max Bellerive, met with Coca-Cola representatives in Haiti earlier in March to discuss the Project. The Prime Minister pledged Haiti’s support for the initiative, stating “Coca-Cola has created the kind of action-oriented initiative that Haiti needs. This partnership will create jobs and new sources of revenue for the people of Haiti. We look forward to working with The Coca-Cola Company, IDB and their partners as we focus our energies on rebuilding our country and achieving sustained economic growth.”

 

The IDB is the leading source of long-term financing for development projects in Latin America and the Caribbean. Its Multilateral Investment Fund (FOMIN), which focuses on poverty reduction through work with micro, small and medium-sized enterprises, has made the Haiti Hope Project eligible for $3 million in funding, and expects to soon obtain its board's approval for the grant. IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno added, “We are proud to join forces with The Coca-Cola Company in this endeavor, which we hope will become a model of how the private sector can play a critical role in Haiti's recovery. We call on other corporations to follow their example, helping the Haitian people build a more prosperous future."

 

TechnoServe, a nonprofit dedicated to creating income, opportunity and economic growth in the developing world through entrepreneurship, will implement this project in Haiti in partnership with local organizations and the government. TechnoServe will provide the services of its business advisors, who will help Haitian mango farmers grow their crops more efficiently, produce additional crops to boost their incomes, and create businesses that will allow them to access markets.

 

The Project will also improve the participation of women in fruit production and develop opportunities for entrepreneurs to establish value-adding businesses in the Haitian mango sector. “This Project will produce long-lasting benefits for Haiti,” said TechnoServe President and CEO Bruce McNamer. “This public/private partnership will build on TechnoServe’s strong track record of similar partnerships underway across the world, including banana, cashews, cocoa and coffee. It will bring world-class business and industry expertise to develop the private sector and improve Haitian livelihoods for many years to come.”

 

Consumers can contribute to this Project by purchasing Odwalla Haiti Hope Mango Lime-Aid launched in the United States this month and a similar Odwalla Haiti Hope beverage to launch early summer in Canada -- 100 percent of the profits will be directed to the Project. Odwalla is a juice company that for 25 years has lived by three principles: make great juice; do good things for the community; and build a business with a heart. Odwalla Haiti Hope Mango Lime-Aid is a delicious blend of Mango and Lime in a refreshing, quencher-style beverage, that may be found at select retailers. Anyone can give directly to the Project, without the purchase of the beverage, by texting “mango” via their mobile device to 50555.

 

This project will be implemented in close collaboration with the Haitian government, given its significance in the country’s broader rebuilding efforts. It is intended to produce lasting benefits for participating mango farm communities, enabling them to benefit from improved livelihoods for many years to come.

 

About The Coca-Cola Company: The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the world’s largest beverage company, refreshing consumers with more than 500 sparkling and still brands. Along with Coca-Cola, recognized as the world’s most valuable brand, the Company’s portfolio includes 12 other billion dollar brands, including Diet Coke, Fanta, Sprite, Coca-Cola Zero, vitaminwater, Powerade, Minute Maid, Simply and Georgia Coffee. Globally, we are the No. 1 provider of sparkling beverages, juices and juice drinks and ready-to-drink teas and coffees. Through the world’s largest beverage distribution system, consumers in more than 200 countries enjoy the Company’s beverages at a rate of 1.6 billion servings a day. With an enduring commitment to building sustainable communities, our Company is focused on initiatives that protect the environment, conserve resources and enhance the economic development of the communities where we operate. For more information about our Company, please visit our website at www.thecoca-colacompany.com 

 

About the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund: In the aftermath of the earthquake, President Barack Obama asked President Bill Clinton and President George W. Bush to raise funds for high-impact relief and long-term recovery efforts to help those who are most in need of assistance. In response, the two Presidents established the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund (CBHF) to respond to unmet needs in the country, foster economic opportunity, improve the quality of life over the long term for those affected, and assist the people of Haiti as they rebuild their lives and "build back better." The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund is doing this by working with and supporting the efforts of reputable 501(c)(3) nongovernmental and nonprofit organizations. Presidents Clinton and Bush oversee the CBHF through their respective nonprofit organizations, the William J. Clinton Foundation and Communities Foundation of Texas. For more information, visit www.clintonbushhaitifund.org.

 

About the Inter-American Development Bank: Established in 1959, the IDB supports economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean, providing solutions by partnering with governments, companies and civil society organizations. Besides loans, credit guarantees and grants, the IDB offers its clients research, policy advice and technical assistance in key areas such as infrastructure, energy, water and sanitation, education and trade. FOMIN (Multilateral Investment Fund), a member of the IDB Group, promotes poverty reduction through private sector development, with an emphasis on microenterprises and small and medium-sized businesses. For more information, visit www.iadb.org 

 

About TechnoServe: TechnoServe is a leader in a movement that empowers people in the developing world to build businesses that break the cycle of poverty. Growing enterprises generate jobs and other income opportunities for poor people, enabling them to improve their lives and secure a better future for their families. Since its founding in 1968, the U.S.-based nonprofit has helped to create or expand thousands of businesses, benefiting millions of people in more than 30 countries. The Financial Times has rated TechnoServe one of the top five NGOs for corporate partnerships. Apart from The Coca-Cola Company, TechnoServe’s corporate partners include Cargill, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, Nestlé-Nespresso, Olam International, Peet’s Coffee & Tea and Unilever, among others. Charity Navigator has also awarded its highest Four Star ranking to TechnoServe. For more information about our organization, please visit our website at www.technoserve.org.

 

About Odwalla: Odwalla Inc., the nation's leading natural health beverage company, delivers nourishment coast to coast with the Odwalla family of juices, juice drinks, soy beverages and nourishing food bars. Odwalla has been making juices and innovating in the natural health beverage category for nearly 30 years. Its nourishing beverages and food bars are available in natural food stores, select supermarkets and specialty outlets throughout the country. To learn more about Odwalla products and Odwalla's commitment to the environment, please visit www.Odwalla.com.

 

Contacts:

The Coca-Cola Company

Dana Bolden, +1 (404) 676-2683

Group Director, Media Relations

pressinquiries@na.ko.com 

 

Inter-American Development Bank

Peter Bate, +1 (202) 320-8547

Senior Communications Specialist

peterb@iadb.org 

 

TechnoServe

Luba Vangelova, +1 (202) 719-1302

Director of Marketing and Communications

lvangelova@tns.org

Comments

Miami Herald
By JACQUELINE CHARLES
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SAUT D'EAU, Haiti -- The mango trapper muscles his way high up the tree then stops on a branch. Spotting a hanging fruit, he pushes his homemade picking pole forward, trapping it. He then drops the kidney-shaped Madame Francis mango to a teenage boy who holds out a rice sack to break its fall.
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It's a homespun harvesting technique that helps feed about a half-million Haitian peasants, but one that is also keeping the $10 million- to $12 million-a-year industry from tapping its full potential. "We would like another way to pick the mangoes," said Ernst Excellent, 22, a farmer who along with his dad, Ernest, is among hundreds off fournisseurs or middle men who wander Haiti's rugged terrain in pursuit of mangoes, most of which end up in U.S. supermarkets.
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``We don't have any help. We don't have any specialist telling us what to do, or what not to do when we are planting. If we had someone, we could grow more mangoes.'' As Haiti seeks to rebuild following the Jan. 12 earthquake, so too does the country's challenging mango industry. One of the few bright spots even before the 7.0-magnitude quake, mangoes and the peasants who grow them have become key in helping put revenue back in this quake-shattered economy.
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``Right now, there are a lot of opportunities,'' said Maria Teresa Villanueva, a senior project officer with the Inter-American Development Bank. ``We think relief and reconstruction are very important, but we also need to work on economic recovery, to make Haiti's long-term development possible.'' The momentum to help Haiti's mango industry begun well before the quake, but has picked up since. For instance, weeks before this year's season opened, executives from Coca-Cola held a reception during an international donors conference for Haiti in New York and unveiled a new juice, Haiti Hope Mango Lime-Aid, to help Haitian mango farmers.
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Still, it will take more than a new juice to help make Haitian mangoes spike in profits. In recent years the industry, because of the lack of groves, has struggled to control a fruit fly problem that forced U.S. Department of Agriculture experts to temporarily suspend exports. Also terrible roads and poor handling techniques by farmers means 40 percent to 60 percent of mangoes are lost before they even arrive at the plants, where they undergo a hot water bath before being exported.
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And then there are the middle men like Excellent, country entrepreneurs who put entire villages to work during mango season, but hold the fate of the industry in their calloused hands. ``A farmer can't fill up a truck by himself,'' said Jean-Maurice Buteau, a mango exporter who recognizes the value of middle-men but says with new regulations and controls being placed on the industry, small farmers are key. ``With minimum support, they can generate more wealth and be greater contributors to their community and the country.''
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Buteau, who is building two centers to reduce the rejects and is working on a plan to turn the remainder into a frozen mango product. ``One of our biggest objectives is to reduce the losses,'' he said. ``As we reduce the loss to the small farmer, we automatically increase our exports.''
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Two years ago, Buteau worked with Haiti's ministry of agriculture to help them develop a GPS-type system to locate traps and identify and estimate the population of fruit flies. In the meantime, others are on the ground helping to organize growers, and see how a country that produces mangoes year round can better reap the benefits at a time when demand for mangoes is up in the United States.
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Under the IDB-Coca-Cola initiative, the goal is to double the income of 25,000 Haitian farmers by giving them access to loans and markets, and teaching them new techniques on harvesting the fruit. ``The key is to work with farmers who have the potential to increase their Francique production from perhaps 10 trees, to plant another seven to 10, and for the existing trees to be more productive,'' said David Williams, regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean for TechnoServe, a nonprofit handling the $7.5 million, five-year IDB-Coca-Cola project.
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Williams said the ultimate goal is to supply not only the fresh export market but to supply puree from Haitian mangoes for Coca-Cola's Odwalla line of juices. ``Haiti is a natural location with an untapped supply that has not been improved upon, and focus on the right varieties,'' he said. Haitian Agriculture Minister Joanas Gue welcomes the initiative saying organizing farmers allows them to deal directly with exporters and ultimately control their own destinies.
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IDB's Villanueva said there is no reason why Haiti's farmers can't organize. ``It has worked in other countries, I don't know why it wouldn't work here,'' she said. ``It's just a matter of showing them what they can do.'' Before the quake, the IDB's investment sections provided local mango exporter CariFRESH with $1.15 million in loans and grants to expand its 25-year family-run business. The money will be used to help train and organize farmers who currently supply the company's mangoes, and with a grove the company recently planted near its Croix de Bouquet factory.
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CariFRESH is investing $800,000 into the project, said IDB spokesman Peter Bate. ``It's a turning point and an opportunity to not only increase your supply, but at having a hand in educating the people who take care of the mangoes,'' said Cassandra Reimers, company vice president.
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She concedes it will not be easy working around the middle-men, who may soon find their roles lessen as growers become increasingly organized. ``We are not trying to eliminate somebody, we are trying to work with everybody,'' she said of the middle-men. ``I don't know if the position they have in the brand new chain will be as fruitful, but the idea isn't to get rid of them, it's to work with them. Everybody has something to gain from the chain.''
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Wilhelm Reimers says there needs to be profound changes to help the mango industry progress from the guy with one or two trees in his backyard, to groves. That will help farmers realize the real value of their mango trees, often the first to be cut down for charcoal when peasants face hard economic times. That value can be seen on almost any given day during mango season in this touristic, central Haiti town where the search for mangoes can take trappers deep into the valley, past rivers and rocky terrain.
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Not not far from this rural town's famous cascading waterfall, women washed and dried Madame Francis mangoes while rented donkeys, packed with the fruit, giddied up and down the gravel country road. One tree could generate as many as 16,800 mangoes, said fournisseur Pascal Bernard, 34. Standing inside a one-room house loaded with dozens of mangoes, he adds up the day's costs, including payments to the trapper, washers and donkeys. There's little profit.
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``We only make [12 cents] on the dozen,'' Bernard said. ``It doesn't support all of my needs but it's what's supporting the lives of each of my children.''

Associated Press
By TAMARA LUSH
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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Former President George W. Bush ambled into a steamy, fragrant mango warehouse in Haiti on Tuesday and surveyed several long tables neatly packed with the luscious fruit. He clapped Ralph Perry, the warehouse owner, on the shoulder. He shook hands with farmers, dressed in button-down shirts and ties for the occasion. Then Bush - who is co-leading a fund to help Haiti since the Jan. 12 earthquake, along with former President Bill Clinton - talked of rebuilding. He confidently said that mangoes will help the country "grow into prosperity" and spoke of a half-million dollar grant to help 25,000 mango farmers. In Haiti, the mango is a symbol of both the country's potential, and its dysfunction.
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There are 10 million mango trees in Haiti, and tens of thousands of mango farmers scattered about the country. Mangoes are the Caribbean nation's second-biggest export, behind coffee, and are a $10 million a year industry. Fruit industry leaders think they have the potential to blossom into a tasty, $90 million a year export business. Most of Perry's mangoes are exported to New York and Miami, home to large Caribbean populations that grew up with the fruit. But Perry and others say there are vast untapped markets of future mango lovers elsewhere in the United States and that the fruit is also growing more popular in Europe. "Twenty years ago, mainstream America didn't know what a mango was," Perry said.
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Yet bruising and a lack of irrigation thwart many crops. Bad roads and the unavailability of seemingly simple tools such as plastic crates have also threatened the success of the country's mango export in recent years. In 2009, only about 10 percent of the crop was shipped abroad. And that was before the quake. Now a number of groups, businesses and people - from Bush to the Coca-Cola Co. - are trying to rebuild Haiti with the mighty mango. Haiti grows a specific variety that is indigenous to the country. Called the "Madame Francis," it is juicy and sweet, and a bit fibrous. "It is most appreciated by the mango connoisseur," said Jean Buteau, a mango exporter in Port-au-Prince.
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Perry, who also has an export business that ships to stores such as Whole Foods in the United States, said there are many obstacles from getting the fruit from "tree to truck." Sometimes farmers sell too early, allowing it to be picked when unripe. In other cases, they lack proper pruning tools. And the fruit is often so damaged that 20 percent to 40 percent of the harvest is lost somewhere between picking and exporting. And Perry knows that customers at Whole Foods, who pay $2 a mango, don't want bruised fruit.
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Another knotty problem is transportation. Even before the earthquake, most roads were a disaster; today, piles of rubble, demolished cars and construction trucks clog traffic. "We need to fix the roads and have better transportation conditions to the warehouses," acknowledged Haitian Agriculture Minister Joanas Gue. In spite of the setbacks, Haiti actually produced a decent mango crop this year, which gives exporters hope. "If you had asked me in January, February, after the earthquake, if we were going to have some kind of a season, I would not really think so," Perry said. "We're lucky and maybe next year we will get a better one." Perry will work closely with TechnoServe, the nonprofit group receiving the $500,000 grant from the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund.
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The money will go to help Haitian farmers with everything from improving their crop yields to building regional drop-off centers where they can sell the fruit to exporters. "Right now, at every step, there are challenges," said Bruce McNamer, president and CEO of TechnoServe. "And the crop has languished. But the beauty of this program is that there is a serious market for mangoes, and that ultimately, (the program) aspires to improve the income of 25,000 farmers." In March, Coca-Cola announced a similar, $7.5 million, five-year project to help mango farmers. The Atlanta-based beverage giant said it will invest $3.5 million in the project, with the Inter-American Development Bank also contributing an undisclosed amount.
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Proceeds from the sale of Haiti Hope Mango Lime-Aid made by Odwalla Inc., will go toward the project. Karen Christensen, global produce coordinator for Whole Foods Market, said the upscale grocery chain has increased sales of organic and conventionally grown Haitian mangoes by 40 percent this year, compared to last. Christensen said they would buy more from Haiti - if more were available. "There's a lack of infrastructure in Haiti that makes purchasing there quite challenging," Christensen said in an e-mail. "Bringing the fruit to market is a complex endeavor - it may involve several layers of middlemen who provide financing, transportation and resale functions."
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Still, Christensen said, Whole Foods wants to push Haiti to export more mangoes. Because so much of the countryside in Haiti has been deforested over the years, Christensen and others believe that giving farmers incentives to plant and cultivate mango trees will help reduce the impacts of deforestation and erosion - and provide much-needed cash for the Haitian people. Mango farmer Paul Joseph Merize - who eagerly shook Bush's hand Tuesday at the Port-au-Prince warehouse - is convinced that mangoes can lift the Haitian economy. The 33-year-old lives and works in a region that was devastated by hurricanes in 2007 and hit hard by the earthquake.
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Merize, whose home was destroyed in January, isn't surprised to hear that people pay so much for a single mango in the United States, while folks here pay about 50 cents for three. "They are delicious mangoes," he said.
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Associated Press Writer Evens Sanon and APTN reporter Flora Charner contributed to this report.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 18, 2010
Press Office: 202-712-4320
Public Information: 202-712-4810
www.usaid.gov
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The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) and the United States Government, acting through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), today announced that USAID will provide an initial contribution of $1 million to the Haiti Hope Project, a public-private initiative that aims to develop a sustainable mango industry in Haiti. In March 2010, The Coca-Cola Company launched the Haiti Hope Project with the introduction of its Odwalla Haiti Hope Mango Lime-Aid, whose profits directly support the Project. Total investment in the Haiti Hope Project now reaches $7.5 million, with $3.5 million from The Coca-Cola Company, $3 million from the Inter-American Development Bank's Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF) and $1 million from the United States Government. TechnoServe will be implementing the Project on the ground. The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund recently announced that it will contribute over $500,000 to support the formation and financing of mango producer groups, nurseries and collection centers to benefit farmers.
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With more than 60 percent of the Haitian population deriving revenue from agriculture, the Haiti Hope Project focuses on improving local mango farming capacity, thereby helping to promote economic growth and sustainable development. The Project aims to empower 25,000 Haitian farmers by doubling their farm income. This initiative builds on a similar collaboration between The Coca-Cola Company and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to improve mango and passion fruit value chains in Kenya and Uganda. The goals of the Haiti Hope Project are to contribute to the long-term development of Haiti by doubling farm income and improving the standard of living of farmers and their families, with a particular focus on women farmers.
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Muhtar Kent, Chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company stated, "The Coca-Cola Company and the U.S. Government, through the Department of State and USAID, have worked successfully together on projects around the world that have made a significant difference in communities. We welcome the opportunity to partner with USAID in Haiti and to augment the sustainable agriculture work they already are undertaking in the country. Together, we are committed to the long-term economic development and revitalization of Haiti."
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The United States Government publicly announced their financial support of the Project in coordination with the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission meeting held on August 17 in Haiti. "Haiti's agricultural sector is critical to the country's long-term economic growth. That's why we are focusing so much of our reconstruction efforts in this area," said USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah. "This effort complements other public-private partnerships that we've launched in Haiti since the earthquake to unlock innovative, locally-driven approaches to meeting urgent development challenges. We are pleased to contribute $1 million in USAID funding to this effort and look forward to working with our project partners to maximize the benefits of this project and help sustainably advance Haiti's long-term recovery."
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"Empowering the people of Haiti and embracing their entrepreneurial spirit, while working in alignment with the Government of Haiti's priorities, will be critical in helping Haiti build back better," said U.S. Ambassador to Haiti Kenneth Merten. As the Project activities continue throughout the year, efforts will focus on enabling mango famers to organize into small groups to increase production and improve supply linkages. Skill assessment and technical training will be facilitated by experts on the ground in Haiti to help farmers diversify their income and stabilize their revenues in the face of food insecurity.
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About The Coca-Cola Company The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the world's largest beverage company, refreshing consumers with more than 500 sparkling and still brands. Along with Coca-Cola®, recognized as the world's most valuable brand, the Company's portfolio includes 12 other billion dollar brands, including Diet Coke®, Fanta®, Sprite®, Coca-Cola Zero®, vitaminwater®, Powerade®, Minute Maid®, Simply® and Georgia®. Globally, we are the No. 1 provider of sparkling beverages, juices and juice drinks and ready-to-drink teas and coffees. Through the world's largest beverage distribution system, consumers in more than 200 countries enjoy the Company's beverages at a rate of 1.6 billion servings a day. With an enduring commitment to building sustainable communities, our Company is focused on initiatives that protect the environment, conserve resources and enhance the economic development of the communities where we operate. For more information about our Company, please visit our website at www.thecoca-colacompany.com.
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About USAID USAID is an independent federal government agency that receives overall foreign policy guidance from the Secretary of State. USAID's work supports long-term and equitable economic growth and advances U.S. foreign policy objectives by supporting: economic growth, agriculture and trade; global health; and, democracy, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance. With headquarters in Washington, D.C., USAID's strength is its field offices around the world. The organization works in close partnership with private voluntary organizations, indigenous organizations, universities, American businesses, international agencies, other governments, and other U.S. government agencies. USAID has working relationships with more than 3,500 American companies and over 300 U.S.-based private voluntary organizations. For more information, please visit our website at www.usaid.gov.
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About the Inter-American Development Bank Established in 1959, the IDB supports economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean, providing solutions by partnering with governments, companies and civil society organizations. Besides loans, credit guarantees and grants, the IDB offers its clients research, policy advice and technical assistance in key areas such as infrastructure, energy, water and sanitation, education and trade. The Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF), a member of the IDB Group, promotes poverty reduction through private sector development, with an emphasis on microenterprises and small and medium-sized businesses. For more information, visit www.iadb.org.
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About the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded after Haiti's January 12, 2010 earthquake, when President Barack Obama asked Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush to lead a major fundraising effort to assist the Haitian people. The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund primarily focuses on longer-term, sustainable economic reconstruction designed to help the people of Haiti rebuild by creating jobs and promoting economic opportunity. For more information, please visit www.ClintonBushHaitiFund.org.
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About the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission The Interim Haiti Recovery Commission (IHRC) was created by presidential decree on April 21, 2010, in the wake of the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti on January 12, 2010. The mission of the IHRC is to undertake the expeditious planning, coordination, and implementation of development projects and priorities, including reviewing and approving projects and programs funded by bilateral and multilateral donors, NGOs and the private sector. The IHRC is co-chaired by Haitian Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive and President Bill Clinton and is guided by a Board, which includes Haitian and non-Haitian stakeholders in reconstruction efforts.
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About TechnoServe TechnoServe is a leader in a movement that empowers people in the developing world to build businesses that break the cycle of poverty. Growing enterprises generate jobs and other income opportunities for poor people, enabling them to improve their lives and secure a better future for their families. Since its founding in 1968, the U.S.-based nonprofit has helped to create or expand thousands of businesses, benefiting millions of people in more than 30 countries. The Financial Times has rated TechnoServe one of the top five NGOs for corporate partnerships. Apart from The Coca-Cola Company, TechnoServe's corporate partners include Cargill, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, Nestlé-Nespresso, Olam International, Peet's Coffee & Tea and Unilever, among others. Charity Navigator has also awarded its highest Four Star ranking to TechnoServe. For more information about our organization, please visit our website at www.technoserve.org.
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For more information and to see how you can contribute, please contact:
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Angela D. Harrell, Director, Media Relations, The Coca-Cola Company Tel: + 1 (404) 676-2683; Email: pressinquiries@na.ko.com
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Peter Bate, Senior Communications Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank Tel: +1 (202) 320-8547; Email: peterb@iadb.org
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Jon Piechowski, Press Attaché, U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince Tel: + 1 (509) 22 29 8837; Email: piechowskije@state.gov
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Meg Galloway Pearce, Vice President, Marketing and Communications, Clinton Bush Haiti Fund Tel: +1 (202) 457-7606; Email: press@clintonbushhaitifund.org
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Luba Vangelova, Director of Marketing and Communications, TechnoServe Tel: +1 (202) 719-1302; Email: lvangelova@tns.org
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For more information about USAID's programs, please visit: usaid.gov. To read our blog, see blog.usaid.gov.

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