Port Au Prince

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Against Their Will: MSF Report on Sexual Violence in Haiti

  • Posted on: 14 July 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Doctors Without Borders, also known by its French acronym MSF, has released a report on sexual violence in Haiti. Gender-Based Violence (GBV) is a human rights and a public health issue as it can cause mental trauma, unwanted pregnancies, and transmission of HIV and sexually transmitted infections.  Stigma remains intense in Haiti due to lack of access to justice and survivor-centered health care.  In 2015, MSF opened a clinic in Port-au-Prince that specializes in providing health and psychological support to GBV survivors.  Take a look at the report (available in English and French with summary below), and if you would like to support MSF, you can do so here

Haitian Women Press for Recognition From U.N. Peacekeeper Fathers

  • Posted on: 2 June 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

As the UN Peackeeping Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) winds down, it leaves a mixed legacy - less insecurit and better police along with an ongoing cholera epidemic and a number of Haitian women who became pregnant by U.N peacekeepers. Reuters journalist Makini Brice notes in her article below that while the United Nations has a "zero tolerance" policy on sexual exploitation and abuse, peacekeepers move on while their children grow up without any support. Haitian lawyers intend to file law suits although the timing is unclear.  The United Nations has a long track record of promising but under-delivering on accountability in peace-keeping operations - how these women are treated will be an indicator of whether anything has changed. 

Look Beyond the Rubble to Haiti's Rich History and Natural Beauty

  • Posted on: 5 May 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is an article by the Evening Standard's Claire Dodd about her experience visiting Haiti - not as an aid worker, missionary, or Haitian visiting family - but as a tourist.  Getting around Haiti may not be easy, but for those with a sense of adventure, it is well worth it.  Haiit's history of resistance, rich culture, and artistic traditions make it a unique and rewarding country to visit.  People often ask how to help Haiti - but as Jean Cyril Pressoir puts it, “...if you want to help...come as a tourist. Help us break from away from this pre-conceived idea, this prejudice that has us defined as a place where you come to help. Don’t come to help us. Come to enjoy yourself.”

2017 International Jazz Festival Wraps Up

  • Posted on: 24 March 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Musicians from around the world performed at the eleventh annual International Jazz Festival in Port au Prince. This is a festival that has faced a great deal of adversity but gets better every year.  Art, music, and history are key to both increasing tourism and showcasing all that is good about Haitian culture.  Think about participating next year.  Mark Sullivan (All About Jazz) provides a read-out of the festival below. 

Kiskeya Guest House Now Offering Cultural Tours

  • Posted on: 3 March 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haiti can be a rewarding but challenging tourism destination.  Having an organization to help with logistics and orientation during the first visit can be helpful. The Kiskeya Guest House in Leogane, in addition to offering a nice place to stay outside of Port au Prince, now offers tours that celebrate Haiti's cultural traditions with an emphasis on Port au Prince, Jacmel and Cap Haitien.  Haitian anthropologist Jean-Yves Blot an Professor Erold Saint-Louis will lead the various trips and Haitian Creole immersion programs.  The agenda for their "Cultural and Mystical Haiti" tour follows.  Note:  The Kiskeya Guest House is associated with Kiskeya Aqua Ferme, a community initiative devoted to raising tilapia and growing cassava, hot peppers, and sweet potatos. 

NPR Music Review: RAM (Manman M Se Ginen)

  • Posted on: 19 February 2016
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

For me, Haiti will always conjure up sounds of rara music. Rara is Haitian street music, often celebrated during Catholic and Vodoun holidays, with a rhythm that is almost hypnotic.  Rara can be both celebration and resistance. NPR recently reviewed RAM - a Haitian band that has long combined elements of rock and rara.  Listen to the review here or read the transcript below. Better yet, go see them perform at the Hotel Oloffson in Port au Prince. 

IOM Reports 92 Percent Decrease in Number of Households Living in Camps

  • Posted on: 6 July 2014
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Solutions to displacement take time, coordination and resources.  According to a recent update by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the total number of households living in camps has decreased by 92 percent compared to four and a half years ago. The government-led rental subsidy program, supported by IOM and donors, has been instrumental in helping households transition.  For more information, view the full report.  

Jalousie Gets a Makeover

  • Posted on: 25 March 2013
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is an article by Trenton Daniel (AP) concerning a beautification project, inspired by Haitian artist Prefete Duffaut, in the neighborhood of Jalousie.  Plans are underway to include additional neighborhoods.  The initiative is not without controversy - slums in Port au Prince have many other needs including water, security, and jobs.  Still, Haiti is a colorful country with a vibrant artistic tradition that Jalousie increasingly reflects. 

Book Review: Farewell, Fred Voodoo

  • Posted on: 20 January 2013
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Amy Wilentz understands Haitian culture, history, and language as few other foreigners do.  This, combined with candor about her own biases and emotions, makes her a compelling writer about a country where nothing is black and white.  Like many of us, she seeks redemption of a sort through Haiti.  Throughout her most recent book, "Farewell, Fred Vodoo", she emphasizes that Haitian perspectives are the best ways to understand the reality of post-earthquake Haiti.  Below is a review by Hector Tobar of the LA Times.  More information about the book and upcoming readings are available on Amy Wilentz's website

Book Review: The Big Truck Went By - How the World Came to Save Haiti And Left Behind a Disaster

  • Posted on: 20 January 2013
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is a review, from Reason, of Jonathan Katz's book on the shortcomings of the international community's efforts to "save" Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.  While no response to the aftermath earthquake, no matter how well-organized or well-resourced would have been sufficient, he emphasizes that the subsequent reconstruction effort was hobbled by a top-down approach that excluded governmental institution, weak as they may have been, local firms, and community groups.  To read an excerpt or purchase the book, take a look at  Amazon.  

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