education

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Haiti Tech Summit (6/2/2017 - 6/5/2017)

  • Posted on: 30 January 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The Haiti Tech Summit will be held from June 2-5 in Port-au-Prince (location to be announced). The Haiti Tech Summit will bring together entrepreneurs, investors, digital marketers and others to address development changes in Haiti that can be addresed through technological innovation. The event is projected to include 100 speakers, 500 companies, and 1,000 attendees. Sign up for updates and more information about program and organizers follows.

Documentary Review: Father Joseph

  • Posted on: 26 September 2016
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

“Father Joseph” is an inspiring documentary about a priest and community leader who has devoted his life to empowering the rural poor. Father Joseph and his colleagues launched and expanded Haiti’s largest micro-credit bank network (Fonkoze), the country’s first rural University, schools, radio station, an orphanage, and more. While the earthquake destroyed much of what had been created, Fondwa has not given up. They are building it back, just as before, little by little. 

New Initiative to Support Plastic Collectors in Haiti

  • Posted on: 23 September 2016
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

In conjunction with Timberland, HP Inc, and the Clinton Global Initiative, Pittsburgh-based company Thread International PBC LTD has launched a three year pilot project in Haiti to street-level plastic bottle collectors by providing education, health care, and job training. The collectors perform a valuable service as plastic,  n addition to being an eyesore, can leech into the soil and clogs drainage canals that are meant to divert water during major storms. More information from Plastics News follows:

More than 230,000 Haitian Children to Benefit from Improved Schooling

  • Posted on: 10 November 2014
  • By: Bryan Schaaf
The World Bank finalized a $24 million grant to Haiti that will help 230,000 children attend schools and receive quality education through tuition waivers and other forms of support. While the Haitian Constitution states children have the right to an education, the vast majority of schools are private and charge fees. Even with public schools, the cost of uniforms can be prohibitive.  More information on the "Education for All" program is available here.  The full announcement follows. 

USAID and Department of Education Announce Support for Education Initiative

  • Posted on: 6 November 2013
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is a USAID/Department of Education announcement of new funding to support the Room to Learn program in Haiti.  Haiti is one of six Room to Learn focus countries, which focuses on improving access to primary education. An estimated 600,000 out of school Haitian children are functionally illiterate.  Education is critical for their growth as well for the growth of Haiti's economy, civil society, and institutions.

Haitian Schools Expand Use of Kreyol

  • Posted on: 7 February 2013
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is an article by Trenton Daniel concerning the increasing use of Haitian Kreyol in schools - which is a good thing.  In a hemisphere dominated by Spanish and English, French remains the language of the Haitian elite.  While true that Haiti has produced artists of note who worked in French, countless children didn't have a chance at a good education because they were instructed in a language neither they nor their teachers were comfortable with.  Learning multiple languages makes sense - but so does being tought in (and proud of) your first language. 

A Postcard from Saint Joseph's

  • Posted on: 14 November 2011
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is a guest blog from Nina Persi, an art student who visited Haiti to document the lives of orphans living in Saint Joseph facilities in/around Port au Prince and Jacmel.  Having returned to Pennsylvania, she is using her photos to raise awareness about vulnerable children in Haiti (of which there are many) and to raise funds for the Saint Joseph Family, an organization doing exceptional work caring for them.  More information on her trip, the Saint Joseph Family, and how you can get involved follows.  

International Action Update (7/15/2011)

  • Posted on: 15 July 2011
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) conditions in Port-au-Prince were not good even before the devastating January 2010 earthquake.  Perversely, the poor often paid the most for drinking water.  Against this backdrop, a number of international organizations and non-governmental organizations are working with the Haitian government to help establish a more effective and equitable water system.  One of these non governmental organizations, International Action, has been involved with water related issues in Haiti since 2006.  Below is an update as to their latest activities.

Envisioning a New Jacmel

  • Posted on: 30 May 2011
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Trade is more important to Haiti’s future than aid.  This includes agricultural revitalization, industrial development, and perhaps growth in the tourism sector. Jacmel, Haiti’s city of art, has always been one of its most appealing cities.  While the city took serious damage during the earthquake, the Capponi Group and the Jacmel Advisory Council are collaborating in the development of Jacmel's downtown, including the construction of a hotel.  At the same time, Yele has committed to developing Jacmel’s first tourism training school.  Concept art and video can be found on the Capponi Group website.  Additional information follows.

Haiti Education and Leadership Program (HELP) Update

  • Posted on: 29 January 2011
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Since 1988, the Haitian Education and Leadership Program (HELP) has provided scholarships to high performing students throughout Haiti based solely on merit.  HELP is still going strong and recently upgraded its website with support from the Mastercard Foundation.  It may well be that the only activity that counts as "sustainable development" is education.  Knowledge and skills can’t be taken away.  In a country where over 40% of the population is under the age of fourteen, education empowers individuals to improve themselves, their communities, and their country.  More information about HELP follows.  

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