Security

Gangs Advance Against Haitian Government

  • Posted on: 31 July 2022
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

According to the United Nations, over 470 people have been killed, injured or are missing in recent violence as gangs war with each other and the government.  Government officials have been told to stay home and the violence is getting closer to key governmental institutions including the National Palace.  This is not the first time that elites have used gangs as mercenaries and/or pawns for achieving their political or economic ambitions.  What is new is the sheer scale of the violence, made worse by illicit shipments of weapons.  The Haitian police are simply out numbered and out-gunned.  Unless the Haitian government and its partners can develop sufficient numbers of well-trained, well-armed, sufficiently paid and reasonable accountable police officers with the right leadership, the situation will only get worse.  The full NYT article by Maria Abi-Habib and Andre Paultre follows. 

Worsening Gang Violence and Kidnappings in Port au Prince

  • Posted on: 13 July 2022
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Gang violence in Haiti's largest city continues to have a pervasive negative impact that reverberates throughout the country, affecting security, the economy, food security, education, and health care.  According to Jacqueline Charles of the Miami Herald, dozens of people have been killed and more than a hundred injured in a new round of deadly violence  "aggravating fuel shortages, raising transportation costs and making an already troubling humanitarian crisis even worse."  Further, 20,000 residents of the densely populated slums have been displaced by gang violence since May.  A July 8 article about gang violence in Port au Prince is copied below and linked is an update by Charles.

UN Establishes Replacement for Departing Haiti Peacekeepers

  • Posted on: 28 June 2019
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Thoughout Haiti's modern history, peacekeeping forces have come and gone.  The transition to a smaller, more politically focused mission has thus been a careful one and goes into effect on October 16th.  The aim is to address the underlying issues that contribute to poverty and instability.  These issues are inherently political - corruption, lack of accountability, poor governance, and failure to show leadership on important issues such as environmental degradation and disaster risk reduction and response which will only get worse due to climate change.  This marks yet another transition for Haiti and, one hopes, a future where no peacekeeping forces are required.  The full article by Miami Herald journalist Jacquelne Charles follows.  

MINUSTAH Releases Semi-Annual Report (August 31 - March 15)

  • Posted on: 14 March 2013
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is the latest semi-annual report from the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) covering the period from August 31st - March 15th. The report provides an overview of key developments during this time, especially police capacity, rule of law, and human rights promotion - all of which need to be strengthened significantly before MINUSTAH can fully transition its responsibilities to the Haitian government.