Community

Haiti to Address Broken Adoption System

By Bryan Schaaf on Sunday, December 2, 2012.

Adoption can be controversial.  In the case of Haiti, many orphanges are poorly managed and with little oversight.  Major challenges are a lack of livelihoods and access to family planning information and commodities.  Many children in orphanages are not really orphans as they have parents - albeit parents that could not afford them.  Trention Daniel notes Haiti is in the process of updating its adoption laws for the first time in 40 years.  This would being Haiti's adoption practices closer to international standards.  Read more »

Lessons From the Storm: What Haiti Can Teach Us

By Bryan Schaaf on Tuesday, October 30, 2012.

Given the extent of internal displacement in Port-au- Prince and environmental degradation beyond, Haiti remains vulnerable to flooding.  You can see the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy in this Washington Post video clip.  There will be much reporting in the days ahead about the loss of lives, homes, and livelihoods.  Drawing on his experience living through the earthquake and reflecting upong Hurricane Sandy's impact, Jonathan Katz takes a moment to remind us of Haitian resilience and solidarity, qualities we can learn from.  Read more »

The Dominican Dream Turned Nightmare for Haitian Migrants

By Bryan Schaaf on Thursday, October 18, 2012.

Equal Times has produced a compelling report on the abuse of Haitian migrants in the Dominican Republic.  It is concise, features remarkable photography and raises important issues such as the extent to which Dominican employers and law enforcement collude with traffickers.  Preventing and responding to abuses is necessary for developing a bilateral relationship between Haiti and the Dominican Republic based on mutual respect. Read more »

Muhammad Yunus Announces Funding for Social Businesses in Haiti

By Bryan Schaaf on Monday, October 15, 2012.

Nobel peace laureate and founder of the Grameen Bank Mohammad Yunus announced on Saturday that his development group will finance several social business projects in Haiti. These include two poultry farms, a plantation of jatropha plants (which can be used for biodiesel), a bakery, and a tilapia fish farm. The full announcement follows. Read more »

Displacement and Development in the Republic of NGOs (Megan Bradley)

By Bryan Schaaf on Friday, October 12, 2012.

Below is a blog by Brookings Institution Fellow Megan Bradley concerning her most recent trip to Haiti.  She reminds us that even now 369,000 Haitians remain displaced.  Finding durable solutions for their plight is a critical element of Haiti's ongoing recovery and long-term development.  While NGOs can help, doing so requires, above all, a stronger Haitian state.  Read more »

Book Preview: Three Goals – My Peace Corps Experience in Haiti (Mason Robbins)

By Bryan Schaaf on Wednesday, August 29, 2012.

Mason Robbins is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in the Grande Anse region of Haiti from 1999-2001.  He lives in Cary, North Carolina and works as a Regulatory Affairs Specialist for a medical device manufacturer.  In his spare time, he wrote a book about his Peace Corps experience in Haiti and will be self-publishing it, with all proceeds going to Haiti-related charitable causes.  Below are some initial excerpts.  We will post regular updates on the status of his book.  In the meantime, feel free to reach out to him at masomail@yahoo.com for more information. Read more »

Toward a Post MINUSTAH Haiti

By Bryan Schaaf on Thursday, August 2, 2012.

Since 2004, MINUSTAH has played a central but controversial role in maintaining stability in Haiti.   However, MINUSTAH should not and is not going to be in Haiti forever.  The International Crisis Group (ICG) describes steps that can prepare Haitian authorities for when they are fully in the lead without MINUSTAH support.  Key to this effort will be doubling the number of police, with adequate vetting and training, so greater responsibility can be transferred to them over time.  Until then, all plans for reconstituting the army should be tabled.  A summary follows below. Read more »

Constitutional Amendments Give Haitians Abroad More Rights

By Bryan Schaaf on Wednesday, June 20, 2012.


As a result of Constitutional amendments published Tuesday, Haitians abroad now have the right to own land and run for lower levels of offices.  Another amendment specifies that 30% of all government workers should be women.  A new electoral council is also to be created.  The hard work now comes in implementing these changes.  An Associated Press article by Evens Sanon concerning the amendments follows below. Read more »

U.S. State Department Releases 2011 Human Rights Report for Haiti

By Bryan Schaaf on Thursday, May 24, 2012.

The U.S. State Department Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL) is mandated to release annual country-specific human rights reports that address individual, civil, political, and worker rights, as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  The 2011 Haiti Human Rights Report is copied below.  Haiti's development depends in large part upon the extent to which human rights are protected, especially for the vulnerable.  That takes the engagement of civil society and a government with the capacity and political will to do so.  As the report makes clear, much remains to be done before we get there.   Read more »

In Haiti, a New Stadium Will Rise

By Bryan Schaaf on Wednesday, May 16, 2012.

Haitians may yet have a stadium to match their passion for soccer. Below is a New York Times blog about a stadium scheduled for construction in Cite Soleil.  The majority of the $5 million dollar project will be financed by Delos LLC as part of the Clinton Global Initiative.  The stadium will seat 12,000 but could be expanded to 20,000 over time.  Best of all, it will be built with local materials and by local workers, maximizing the economic impact.  Read more »